Health Risks and Poor Health Symptoms Don’t Wait for January

Thanksgiving is a week away, then Christmas and New Year’s a month after that.  For many people, this mean’s stopping whatever “healthy habits” they had developed in 2017.  If it truly is a habit, then life continues as is regardless of the calendar.  For those not so much a habit, then the insanity of the same cycle begins again.  The gym is less crowded now, eating habits slack off since Halloween, and focus is now on Black Friday.  The unfortunate part of all the “holiday cheer” is your body still requires the same attention now as it did in January, April, and June, when you tried to get in shape for the new year, spring break, and summer.  For those in the over 60 community, another host of health risks continue to move forward when caring for the body slows or stops.

Dementia and memory problems don’t just happen overnight, they are progressive over months and possibly years.  When you actually notice them and go to a doctor, it could be too late.  Lack of exercise, poor diet, and inadequate sleep all are major contributors to when and how severe these diseases are when they strike.  It starts with small lapses like forgetting why you walk into a room, or just a little off balance when stepping out of the car.  You may think it’s a one-time occurrence, but much sooner than you realize it becomes a regular occurrence which you deem natural life changes.  Yes, they are natural life changes, but you accelerated them due to health behavioral changes.  Does all this mean gloom and doom with eminent death tomorrow??  The answer is, no.

We are all humans and prefer the path of least resistance.  In saying that and as I write this in south Louisiana where we LOVE to eat, drink, and be merry year round; be mindful of what you do more as a 60+ population.  Continue working on your fitness with balance, agility, and coordination exercises in the gym, at home, or with friends.  Have a piece of cake or pie, just not everyday, same with a cocktail.  Those who mix in moderation on a weekly basis do not overdose on food and booze during the holidays.  Stroke and heart attack don’t wait for January  1 when you start the same resolutions that end on January 31.

You can’t undo years of abuse and neglect to yourself in one day, week, or month.  You can begin to change the aging process each day and start TODAY!!  Going cold turkey from daily dessert and 3 beers is hard.  Start today by going down to 2 beers and skip dessert every-other-day.  Soon you’ll see small changes and feel better which makes you want to do more.  Practice standing on one leg for 10 seconds once a day, then add a second time a day next week.  All of these small, easily accomplished adjustments reduce your risk of falls, injuries and disease.  Before you know it, your doctor may smile more and possibly take you off one of the 10 pills you take each day.

 

To sum it up, health issues don’t wait for resolutions and a sunny day.  They strike when you least expect it and the damage cannot be reversed.  Literally make today the first day of the rest of your life by adjusting one small part of your health.  1, 5, 10 years from now, you’ll be happy you’re looking down at the ground and surrounded by friends wearing bright clothes, not them wearing black looking down at the ground where you’re buried.

 

For help with balance, agility, and coordination, try Movement Academy this year. We guarantee you’ll stay on your feet and make it a holiday season to remember!

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Balance: The Great Equalizer

#workoutwednesday #wellnesswednesday

As a personal trainer since 2008, I have worked with clients of all ages, sizes, and types of health goals.  The one aspect of fitness that all of them struggled on is balance.  In a recent training session with a client, another male gym member who works out religiously and is in great shape, commented on a balance movement I was teaching a female over 50 client.  When I asked him to try the simple movement of touching his toe with a slightly flexed knee standing on one foot, he fell over.  Reaching down to touch your toe standing on one foot is not complicated and does not require massive amounts of strength.  You might say, “Oh I can do that, no problem,” and you may be able too.  Can you do it equally well on either foot?

 

Dictionary.com defines balance a number of ways and parts of speech.  The best definition they have for my purpose is a state of bodily equilibrium.  Can you maintain equilibrium when placed in unsteady positions, that is the whole key to balance in a physical fitness and exercise standpoint.  How do you improve balance?  You have to work on it consistently.  If you are a gym goer, try movements like dumbbell bicep curls on one foot, use a BOSU ball for standing dumbbell shoulder presses, try a one leg RDL/toe touch.  When talking about the over 60 population, balance is where life can literally fall apart.

The CDC says falls are the number one cause of injury in senior citizens.  Fall prevention programs are usually part of senior care facilities and medical personnel training that work in those environments.  When I teach the over 60 workout class at the health club I work at, they all want to improve their balance. My individual clients in the same age group also want more balance training because they know it is a fine line between injury and full mobility.  The CDC suggests two or more days a week of muscle strengthening activities for older adults.  Get off the machines and use free weights.  Make the body stabilize and balance in a variety of positions.  More muscle used equals more calories burned anyway, so don’t be afraid of the 10 lb dumbbells.

You may be asking, “How do I find balance exercises and do them safely without killing myself?”  There are a number of answers to fit everyone’s budget.  You can hire a personal trainer like me at your gym/health club, join a group exercise class, find a program online, or make something up at home.  Whatever you do as an active older adult, make sure you stick too it and afford.  For the online group, my company Movement Academy has a program to help called Active Aging System.  For a limited time, it is only $10.95 per month and guaranteed to help you improve your balance.  Check it out, no contract and very affordable.

 

Balance is key to a longer, healthier life in every aspect.

Matt Peale is an NASM Certified Personal Trainer since 2008.  You can contact him at mpeale@ltmacademy.com and give the Active Aging System a try if you are comfortable with online programs.

Physical Activity & Physical Exercise, Aren’t They The Same?

#Wellnesswednesday and #workouwednesday are perfect hashtags for figuring out if there is a difference between physical activity and physical exercise.  People say they “get their exercise” from cleaning the house, taking care of young children, gardening/mowing the lawn, etc.  While those activities do take energy and make you tired after a few hours or all day of doing them, are they truly exercise?

The medical definition of physical activity is the quality or process of exerting energy or of accomplishing an effect.  Per the definition, physical activity does result in fatigue from exerting energy for any duration.  Nothing is specific about what kind of process or the purpose of that process.  Also, nothing  is mentioned about health related benefits.  Is physical activity important to an overall healthy lifestyle?  The answer is absolutely yes.  You need to be physically active at some point during the day to engage various muscles of the body and elevate your heart rate above its resting state.  The definition applies to all age groups, there is no discrimination.  After cleaning the house or mowing the lawn, the physical activity does have a caloric use value, and possibly enough muscle contractions to have a growth or strengthening effect.

The medical definition of physical exercise is physical activity that is planned, structured, and repetitive for the purpose of conditioning any part of the body. Exercise is used to improve health, maintain fitness and is important as a means of physical rehabilitation.   Exercise is a physical activity, but so much more!  Back to mowing the lawn and cleaning the house, those activities are not planned, structured, and repetitive for the purpose of conditioning any part of the body.  To say “I got my exercise today because I cleaned the house,” is false.  Cleaning the house is NOT exercise.  

For children and adults over 65 there are various guidelines from the CDC on how much physical activity and physical exercise each group needs per day and week.  Be sure you know what is appropriate for your current fitness level and seek professional help when appropriate.  Let us be honest with ourselves when we look in the mirror and see the results of physical exercise in our lives.  Similar discussion to being busy vs productive, know the difference and make the changes in your life.  The internet has allowed everyone of all income levels to have resources and information about physical exercise, take advantage of it.  Living longer, healthier, and happier are pretty good reasons to exercise for a healthy and active lifestyle.

 

If you agree or disagree with Matt Peale, comment below or send him an email to mpeale@ltmacademy.com.  Movement Academy may be right for you or someone you love, check it out and see.  If not, find something that does work for you.

Mixing Recreation & Exercise for Seniors and Baby Boomers

Today I started a new journey of hosting a streaming internet show called The Second Half: Health & Fitness Show broadcast live on Facebook.  I have never hosted anything live on any kind of media so it was a pretty amazing experience!  The first Thursday of every month I will be interviewing people in the health and fitness field who’s market are Baby Boomers and senior citizens.  The guest today was C Hope Health Services and its owner Wesley Cornelius.  I met Wesley at a networking meeting earlier this year and we hit it off as our businesses relate and overlap.

Wesley is a recreational therapist and went to the same college I did, the University of Southern Mississippi, but he is a bit younger than me.  Our interview involved combining exercise and recreation to create an optimal enjoyment for physical activity.  One of the commonalities of recreational therapy and physical exercise is the positive effects they have on cognitive response.  Physical exercise helps to improve neuroplasticity which then enables a person to have more intellectual stimulation from games and social interaction.  Creating the new neural pathways that complex movements and aerobic training allows for more and longer enjoyment of games that require thought and strategy.  Combined with doing recreational therapy in a social setting with new and old friends, a person experiences a deeper pleasure and satisfaction with themselves.

At the end of the day, if exercise and activity are not fun, a person will not stick with it.  They know the physical, mental, and social benefits, but it does not matter without any enjoyment.  When looking or directing an older family member/friend to be more active, remember it can be a combination of activities that they enjoy doing.  It is easier said than done at times when a loved one refuses to be active, but don’t give up on them.  Find out what they consider fun, then gear exercise and games toward it.  Your success rate will be much higher and the smile on their face a lot broader when they truly love being active and healthy.

Matt Peale does his best to make exercise fun for his personal training clients, although sometimes in the process they don’t like him.  But you can create your own fun with Movement Academy’s Active Aging System for Boomers and seniors. Contact Matt at mpeale@ltmacademy with any questions. #thoughtfulthursday #babyboomers #exercise #workout

 

 

 

 

 

Socializing & Working Out for Seniors & Baby Boomers

Every Monday and Friday morning I teach an exercise class that has become predominantly people over 55 with the oldest being 86.  Besides the physical health benefits, they also enjoy talking to each other and the socialization that occurs.  I could be a drill sergeant type and make them workout harder with no time to talk, but that will only drive them away and reduce their enjoyment of showing up.  Not everyone likes to workout in a group.  I also see a number of seniors on machines in the fitness area of my health club staying to themselves.  Either way is fine, overall point being to be active and healthy.

Why do I allow the class participants to roam around some and skip a few movements here and there?  Because if exercise is not fun to an extent, my class will be empty.  Livestrong talks about socialization also improving memory through companionship and interaction.  In previous blogs I have discussed the benefits of physical exercise on neuroplasticity, and adding a social outlet can stimulate the brain further to push off signs of dementia.  As the seniors sing to songs of their adolescent and young adult years, they don’t consciously realize all of the benefits their brains are receiving from the multitude of stimuli.  Complex resistance movements, cardiovascular, and forced cognitive functioning through conversation is the best of all worlds.

 

From a personal trainer standpoint, it is important to vary the movements for continued physical and mental progress.  One of the downfalls to attending the same class regularly is the lack of development when the body does the same thing for 4 weeks or more.  The FITT (Frequency, Intensity, Time, Type) must change regularly for the body to adapt and improve.  This is a biological fact regardless of a person’s age and also important to reduce injuries from over training the same body parts in the same directions.  Vary everything, including working out alone and with groups.  Change is beneficial to improved physical and mental fitness over time.  For an example of a program that can be done anywhere, anytime, in a group, or alone, check out Movement Academy for only $10.95 a month.

 

If you have any questions, email me (Matt Peale) at mpeale@ltmacademy.com.  I am certified by NASM as a personal trainer and have been so since 2009.  Thanks for reading!

Healthy Habit Setting

We all have heard the classic it takes 21 days to set or change a habit.  How many of you have documented proof that on day 21 you have completely learned or unlearned a bad habit?  Not very many of you have this proof.  One of the reasons is science now tells us after 21 days you barely 1/3 of the way to making that change permanent.  In a study found in the European Journal of Social Psychology, it states that changing habits takes 66 days!  No wonder it is so difficult to make changes that last.

In today’s “give it to me now” society, 66 days seems like 66 months.  What is a person to do about this?  Well the range of days is actually 18-254, depending on the person.  The point is learning new healthier habits takes work and is not easy. Stick to a challenging yet realistic plan that sets you up for success.  If for some reason you do not accomplish the goal for the day, no worries, everything is fine, start again the next day.  Continuing to build momentum toward making a permanent change is the main focus and having a bad day or two is just human. With weight loss for example, two to three pounds a week is what you will average out when your weight goal is done.  It starts with making better choices on a daily basis and learning from the failures and successes.

The motivation comes from your Why.  If your Why is not big enough, your habit will not change.  Think about your Why everyday and let it guide you to make those healthier choices of walking, eating less sugar, or lifting more weight than usual.  Adding up the small daily wins gives you the huge victory in 66 short days later!  Get some support and accountability, then change your mindset to a longer view than tomorrow.  A healthier you is loved and appreciated by everyone you have a relationship with: business, family, friends, and personal.

Matt Peale is not immune to bad habits.  He hates getting up early to exercise like anyone else, even though he is an NASM Certified Personal Trainer.  Contact him at mpeale@ltmacademy.com any time.  Also Like his Facebook page and check out how Learn To Move Academy can help your school, sports team, and Active Aging process.

 

Can You Teach an Old Dog Old Tricks..

As the saying goes, you can’t teach an old dog new tricks.  In working with Baby Boomer generation and senior citizens, it’s more can you teach an old dog old tricks they don’t think they can do anymore.  The short answer is yes.  The science of neuroplasticity states just that concept.  Medicine Net defines neuroplasticity as the brain’s ability to reorganize itself by forming new neural connections throughout life. Neuroplasticity allows the neurons (nerve cells) in the brain to compensate for injury and disease and to adjust their activities in response to new situations or to changes in their environment.  As people age and become more sedentary, they learn new (and yes bad) habits in regards to posture and movement.  Through exercise, people have to relearn the movements and habits they had as younger adults.

Does this mean exercise can reverse the signs of aging and years of poor healthy habits?  No.  What a structured physical exercise program like Learn To Move Academy can do, is teach Baby Boomers and senior citizens the movement patterns they stopped doing years ago.  It’s not about how much weight a person can lift, but building in the neuroplasticity to perform these tasks in an efficient manner to reduce injury and strengthen muscles, bones, and connective tissues.  Once the movement patterns are reintroduced, then it is a repetition and quality of practice issue.  Time spent on performing over and over again these movements with correct form and appropriate resistance (if necessary) is the only way to learn and improve.  Take the time and invest in some kind of professional help to ensure you are starting at the correct point and progressing in a reasonable manner.

The mental benefits of learning new old movement patterns are just as beneficial as the physical ones.  Tons of new research coming out on physical exercise reducing symptoms of dementia and improving cognitive functions.  Go learn those old tricks, your heart, brain, and muscles will thank you!

 

Matt Peale is a certified personal trainer with NASM since 2009 and the Sales Director/Partner at Learn To Move Academy.  Soon he will be contributing a monthly article to Boomers Lifestyle Network magazine.  Contact Matt with any questions or comments at mpeale@ltmacademy.com.