Exercise Prescription for ADD/ADHD?

So your child has ADHD or you have ADD, yes really not just because friends make fun of you.  You all know the kid who has problems in school and when he or she does not take their medications.  But what if there is something more natural and without negative side effects?  Turns out old reliable exercise can help kids and adults with ADD/ADHD manage the symptoms.  As always, consult your personal doctor for what is best, but imagine the only side effect is a stronger and healthier body!

American Professional Society of ADHD and Related Disorders

ADHD in simple language is the brain’s neurons in the attention system not communicating consistently to each other.  Sometimes the messages come across whole, sometimes they do not at all or have been partially chopped off.  A study in the Journal of Attention Disorders showed that doing moderate to vigorous intensity exercise forty-five minutes a day, three times a week, for ten weeks improved cognitive function and behavior in children with ADHD. The reasoning behind this improvement is that exercise can help the growth of new nerve cells. Children are constantly developing physically and mentally, which are times when neuroplasticity is also at its height.  Learning new functions requires the brain to build new neural pathways which can help the lapses in the attention system improve.

Does a child need to run a marathon, play soccer, or weight lift?  Dr. Michael Lara suggests challenging activities like martial arts, rock climbing, and ice skating are better than just aerobic exercise.  The complex movements activate various areas in the brain associated with balance & stability, endurance, and coordination.  Have you ever stood on one leg and reached down to touch your toes?  Easy at is sounds, many people fall over doing it.  The ADHD brain has a need for structure, variety, incorporating new skills, and a way to measure results.  Talk to a professional and determine what activities make sense for your child’s age and development level.  In some cases, medications have become more effective with exercise and/or replaced based on a doctor’s approval.

 

Check out www.movementacademy.net and their web based program that may help your child improve.  Contact Matt Peale at mpeale@ltmacademy.com for any questions.  Remember, exercise has so many more benefits than physical and costs generally nothing.  Give it a try!

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